Album Review: The Cranberries Roses

1 May 2012 | 8:43 pm | Helen Lear

For any big Cranberries fans, this album will be a treat, although it could pack a bit more punch.

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The Cranberries are the latest in a long line of bands reforming for one last bite of the musical cherry. Following a six-year hiatus, their latest album Roses is a comforting reflection back to the days of early albums Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We? and No Need To Argue.

The band's sixth studio album has been produced by their long-term friend and collaborator Stephen Street (The Smiths, Blur), ensuring their original sound has been maintained. Roses doesn't feature any obvious stand-out hits of the ilk of Zombie or Dreams, but the collection of 11 guitar-led ballads and pop/rock tracks are enough to hold attention and offer a fresher, more positive vibe to their earlier sound.

Opening track Conduct channels Sigur Ros with an intro of eerie strings before Dolores O'Riordan's trademark vocals and gently plucked acoustic guitar bring it back to traditional Cranberries territory. Schizophrenic Playboys, a title you wouldn't expect to read on a Cranberries setlist, picks up the pace on the topic of sexual predators “who cannot control their toys”, and is one of the more memorable tracks on the album. Other tracks worth a listen include the paranoid over-thinking Tomorrow“I think that you're mad, you spend a lot of time in your head” – the lyrically simple Show Me and Losing My Mind, all of which feature a winning combination of a down-tempo guitar-led verse with a perky, lifting chorus that the band do so well.

For any big Cranberries fans, this album will be a treat, although it could pack a bit more punch.

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