Link to our Facebook
Link to our Instagram

Live Review: Turnover, Turnstile, Oslow, Homesick

9 March 2018 | 6:45 pm | Luke Dassaklis

"It was a shame that they spent almost song length amounts of time in between tracks tuning their instruments, leaving the audience to fill these gaps in the audio with their own musings."

More Turnover More Turnover

Homesick kicked everything off and were visibly stoked to be playing the show. Their infectious brand of pop punk definitely got everyone in the right mood for the rest of the evening. Oslow were up not too long later and carried on the good vibes, dialling down the pop punk and bracing everyone for the punky-shoegaze to come.

Turnstile were both energetic and enthusiastic. They played a brash hardcore that would not have felt out of place in the early '90s. They looked like five kids on tour living out their dreams. The bass player, Franz Lyons, at one point was so enveloped by the tunes he threw his bass on the floor and back flipped off the stage into the crowd. If they're still making Tony Hawk's Pro Skater games, it wouldn't be surprising to see them on the next soundtrack.

Unlike many other bands, there was no great hype before Turnover started playing. They all wandered on stage, began sound checking and before the idle chatter had time to subside into applause, they had begun. A meek verbal introduction was offered by frontman, Austin Getz, before they kept on keeping on. Humming was a well-received opener; Super Natural followed and was equally well-received.

There was a noticeable lull in the middle of the show. The band spent longer than necessary faffing about with their pedals and amps, before apologising for technical difficulties that were not immediately apparent to anyone who hadn't spent the vast majority of their teenage years neck deep in guitar magazines. They continued with tracks from their latest album, which were received with little more than a polite interest from the crowd.

Don't miss a beat with our FREE daily newsletter

They pulled themselves out of this lull in emphatic style. Peripheral Vision is a phenomenal album and it seemed as though that is what everyone wanted to hear. New Scream rolled into Cutting My Fingers Off which in turn made way for Hello Euphoria. Each song built more hype and energy from the audience than its predecessor, inciting the audience to croon every word right back at the band. They ended rather abruptly on Dizzy On The Comedown, the audience notably confused when the houselights came up and the band exited.

When they actually played their music - especially songs from their second record - Turnover were incredible. The guitars were drenched in phasers and sounded amazingly crystalline; the bass thick and driving, carrying the rest of the band. It was a shame that they spent almost song length amounts of time in between tracks tuning their instruments, leaving the audience to fill these gaps in the audio with their own musings. This took away from the overall experience, breaking a type of fourth wall and dispelling some of the magic that a dreamy band like Turnover inherently possesses. The highs were high, but the lows were very dull.