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Live Review: Jam Sandwich

26 July 2016 | 6:58 pm | Sean Drill

"Frontman Steven Knoth took a break between songs to discuss his own mental health issues that arose from being the victim of an unprovoked assault nearly a decade ago."

The Rosemount Hotel hosted a mini-festival on Friday night in support of headspace, the youth mental health service
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Twenty bucks got you entry and sets from 12 different bands ($1.67 a show), which is a bargain in anybody's book, with the benefit of all proceeds going to help youth mental health. The whole evening had the crowd squeezing into the 459 lounge followed by dancing out in the main room.

Opening the main room was At The Space Jam, a ska-punk act who brought along a four-piece brass section. These guys are really fun to watch, dancing in time and playing at a frenetic pace, before dropping into some heavy dub tracks. Definitely need to check these guys out next time they are on.

Joe Head Joe is a two-piece noise-punk act, with some jazz influences. Scatological lyrics about dirty underwear and sharehouse living were interjected by heckles to and from the audience. They didn't seem to be taking the whole affair very seriously, but played a really interesting set to the subdued crowd.

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Moana were up next, and played the best set of the night. Mixing dark psychedelia with soaring female vocals, they truly are a band deserving of much more acclaim and a wider following. Imagine PJ Harvey fronting The Doors, and you are only halfway there. Vocalist Moana Lutton had the crowd transfixed; not even spilling a pint on the keyboard or a broken guitar string could keep this band down. Definitely one to catch.

Them Sharks seem like a really cool dad band. Three dudes who get together in a garage and just rock out with their... shirts off.  Surf-rock, reggae and punk are mixed in equal measures and these guys just ooze happiness when playing. The crowd definitely got caught up in the emotion as little impromptu dance sets broke out among the sardine-tight crowd.

Scalphunter are a punk act that take no prisoners. And its most fitting that the four-piece were on the Jam Sandwich line-up. Frontman Steven Knoth took a break between songs to discuss his own mental health issues that arose from being the victim of an unprovoked assault nearly a decade ago. Knoth opened his heart and showed a level of vulnerability not often seen at punk gigs — the story really seemed to resonate with the crowd.

The final headline act was Perth stalwarts, The Love Junkies. All feedback and chunky guitar riffs, the main room was packed out, pushing the speakers to a pretty intense level. Packed full of crowd favourites, the set had the best response from the crowd of all the acts of the night.