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Live Review: Turnstyle, The Long Lost Brothers, Ursula

30 June 2015 | 1:19 pm | Rick Bryant

"Newer tracks slotted in fairly easily alongside the older numbers, but they were notable for the fact that they contained a little extra muscle."

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Armed with a slacker, nonchalant view on things, Ursula warmed up the crowd with a set of grungy pop that wound back the clock rather appropriately considering tonight’s headliner or the focal point of the band that was to follow. Having only been together for a couple of months, the four-piece proved tight enough and their tracks showed promise, but they’d add a robust string to their bow if their guitarist was more prominent. Smatterings of humour added to the festive vibe of the evening, and they easily retained interest for the duration of their set.

With Andrew Ryan leading the charge, The Long Lost Brothers are never going to be short of visual or musical intrigue. It’s no stretch to say that, in the Perth music scene, there’s no one who can match his guitar style and proficiency. From Adam Said Galore to Busta Cube and beyond, those powerful chord progressions and slightly abrasive, always melodious riffs are beautiful to witness and impossible to replicate, and here they were out in full force. Having undergone a few line-up changes in their relatively brief history, The Long Lost Brothers have hit on a good formula and there’s certainly a lot of potential on which to draw. 

As with almost every gig they’ve ever played, there was a sense of unbridled joy that permeated the air with Turnstyle’s imminent return to the stage. Having hung up their bats a few years ago, it’s been a fairly productive last two years since coming out of retirement. Though they might be a little greyer on top — and a little rounder below — the passion and energy haven’t diminished, and with good reason; you’d be hard-pressed to find a band whose tracks have so effortlessly stood the test of time. Old favourites like Novak’s Plan, Spray Water On The Stereo and Purple Crown were as enjoyable as they were 15 years ago, and the fact that they’ve aged so well is thanks to the superb, unforgettable melodies that infiltrate every song. Newer tracks slotted in fairly easily alongside the older numbers, but they were notable for the fact that they contained a little extra muscle. It was a highly enjoyable, hugely welcome return — let’s hope they keep hanging around for a while longer.