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Album Review: Reptar - Body Faucet

5 June 2012 | 4:21 pm | Katherine Edmonds

Body Faucet offers up an outlandish infusion of afro-pop, electronica, dance, and anything ‘80s, and it’s guaranteed to get you moving.

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Hailed as the runaway success of SXSW, the imminent release of Reptar's first full-length album evoked great anticipation. Renowned for their exuberant live performances, the quartet have produced exactly what was expected of them. But, for a group distinguished by being unpredictable and eccentric, somehow that's not quite enough and they have found themselves tottering on the line somewhere between synth and substance. Produced by Ben Allen, best known for his work with Animal Collective, Body Faucet is cleaner and more consistent than EP Oblangle Fizz Y'all; it's youthful and blindly confident, without even a hint that this is a band still finding their place – they've found their feet and planted them squarely on the dancefloor. Is it revolutionary? No. But dammit, it's catchy.

Opening track Sebastian sets the tone perfectly for the bouncy, pop explosion that carries through the album. Please Don't Kill Me and Houseboat Babies, especially, showcase the percussion and synth riffs that you 'feel in your bones and your feet'. Orifice Origami has all the trademarks of an amazing live track, right down to the synchronised hand clapping. Cue audience participation.  Three Shining Suns is uncharacteristically subdued, but perfectly placed to give those bobbing heads and tapping feet a short break before being bombarded once again with the melodious beats of Water Runs. Arguably the standout track of the album, it's simple, fun and just makes you want to dance.

Body Faucet offers up an outlandish infusion of afro-pop, electronica, dance, and anything '80s, and it's guaranteed to get you moving.